General Islamic Topic

Happy Eid Fitr! Eid Mubarak!

Today, 5 June 2019 / 1 Shawal 1440 Hijri; Muslims give thanks to Allah for His bounty and mercy, celebrate the holy days, and wish each other well. While appropriate words in any language are welcome, or “Eid Mubarak”. This translates as “blessed Eid.” It is a phrase frequently used by Muslims greeting one another during the Eid holidays and has a somewhat formal tone of respect.

What does Eid Fitr mean?

Roughly translated, Eid Fitr means the “festival of ending the fast” it is marked by a special prayer on the morning of the first of Shawal.

Is it a public holiday?

Yes! Eid Fitr is a public holiday usually for most of the Islamic countries

What do Muslims do during Eid?

It is customary for a Muslim to wake up early in the morning and clean themselves, dress in smart clothes before going to the mosque to pray a special prayer for eid.

The Eid Fitr prayers are called “Salat Al Eid” in Arabic. There is no audible call to prayer for the Eid prayers. Muslims will gather in a mosque or open space en masse and offer two units of prayer – called “Rakaat”. A sermon follows, which the imam asks for forgiveness, mercy, and peace for every being across the world.

As fasting is forbidden during Eid, Muslims will have a light breakfast and will usually have a bigger lunch, while visiting the elderly of the family.

It is also essential that Muslims donate to charity to help the poor and needy before the Eid prayers. This is called “Zakat”, and the amount which is given to charity is calculated based on one’s personal possessions.

Muslims are required to walk to Eid prayers and forgive and forget any arguments that they may have had over the last year.

Guidance for Non-Muslims

Non-muslims can say “Blessed Eid” or “Eid mubarak” for greetings. These traditional greetings are normally exchanged between Muslims, but it is usually regarded as appropriate for non-Muslims to offer respects to their Muslim friends and acquaintances with any of these greetings.

It is also always appropriate for non-Muslims to use the Salam greeting when meeting a Muslim at any time. In Islamic tradition, Muslims usually do not initiate the greeting themselves when meeting a non-Muslim, but will cordially respond when a non-Muslim does so.

“As-Salam-u-Alaikum” (“Peace be unto you”).

May today will be the blessed day! Amin


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